Day 5 – Firing on all cylinders

It’s all go today. Was hooked up to what I think is the main drug of R-DHAB chemotherapy, Cisplatin, which is given over 24 hours. During the full course of the treatment (four or five days I think) I am also receiving fluids through a second line. Apparently Cisplatin can cause problems with kidney function so it is important to stay well hydrated. This is all well and good apart from the fact that I have to empty my bladder roughly every forty-five mins or so, which is getting a little tiresome. Fortunately however my bed is right next to the toilet so I don’t have to far to go.


All ready for a huge does of the good stuff. Let’s hope it’s tearing the Lymphoma a new one.

On the subject of peeing, it would seem this is a rather risky business to undertake. Most of the time when your are in hospital they have you do it in a bottle so they can monitor various things. So one of the guys in the ward goes to the toilet and re-appears a few minutes later in search of a cleaner. He then tells me that while he was doing his business he gradually felt a warm liquid around his feet. He looked down to see that what it was, only to find that what was going into the bottle was exiting just as quickly via a hole in the bottom! Note to self; stand over the toilet when taking a whiz into a bottle.

Then it was time for lunch and it was another passable effort by the fine chefs. The soup was apparently vegetable, and it tasted the most like lentil yet, except with a lot of pepper. Haven’t had the chance to try actual lentil soup yet, look forward to that one. Main course was Stovies and it’s pretty hard for even the hospital to mess that one up. Looked like Stovies and mostly tasted like Stovies.

Pretty uneventful afternoon. My mother-in-law kindly visited in my wife’s absence bringing with her a plentiful supply of biscuits (always a good idea to have a small stash of food for between meal hunger and for emergencies when lunch or supper is particularly rancid). Also brought me a couple of pairs of shorts which was much appreciated. The heat in this place is ridiculous at times, far to warm for the jogging bottoms I have. I’m not really a shorts man due to my ridiculously knobbly knees, but to hell with that, making myself cooler is of far higher importance.

And that brings us to supper which I have just finished. The menu was particularly crap. Why do the hospitals insist on trying to get all Gordon Ramsay when they can’t even get the basics right. So I gave all the stuff with fancy names a miss and opted for cheese salad. It’s been a long time since I ordered any kind of salad. This is mainly because when I last had one, it consisted of a couple of slices of whatever meat came with the so called salad which was a few pieces of lettuce and a slice of tomato. Well check this bad-boy out:

I’m sure you can imagine my surprise when this was plonked in front me. Dare I say it actually looked kind of good (by hospital standards, lets not get too carried away here) and tasted alright too. This along with the Stovies must be the kitchens Pièce de résistance as they are by far the best things on the menu so far. They should just serve that on alternative nights and bin everything else until they can do a better job of it.

So far I’m not suffering any side effects from the treatment, but early days, they usually come a day or two after it has finished. All my hair fell out last time and has only just started to grow back. I expect the same thing to happen again along with usual symptoms that come with it which generally make you feel like total crap. Sure is a whole lotta fun…

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2 responses to “Day 5 – Firing on all cylinders

  • Big Mac.

    At lest the food seems a bit better…maybe the chefs are reading,or maybe they had a night off and the cleaners are responsible for the salad…..
    As for the shorts, shame you’re not at Butlins as they have a knobbly knee competition,you might have won a prize,only down side….the food is even worse there!!!!xxx

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